var yall=function(){"use strict";function _extends(){return(_extends=Object.assign||function(e){for(var t=1;t0&&(e=!0,setTimeout(function(){u.forEach(function(e){e.getBoundingClientRect().top<=window.innerHeight+r.threshold&&e.getBoundingClientRect().bottom>=-r.threshold&&"none"!==getComputedStyle(e).display&&(!0===r.idlyLoad&&!0===t.idleCallbackSupport?requestIdleCallback(function(){i(e)},o):i(e),e.classList.remove(r.lazyClass),u=u.filter(function(t){return t!==e}))}),e=!1,0===u.length&&!1===r.observeChanges&&t.eventsToBind.forEach(function(e){return e[0].removeEventListener(e[1],yallBack)})},r.throttleTime))},u=a(document.querySelectorAll(n));if(!0===t.intersectionObserverSupport){var c=new IntersectionObserver(function(e,n){e.forEach(function(e){if(!0===e.isIntersecting||e.intersectionRatio>0){var a=e.target;!0===r.idlyLoad&&!0===t.idleCallbackSupport?requestIdleCallback(function(){return i(a)},o):i(a),a.classList.remove(r.lazyClass),n.unobserve(a),u=u.filter(function(e){return e!==a})}})},{rootMargin:r.threshold+"px 0%"});u.forEach(function(e){return c.observe(e)})}else t.eventsToBind.forEach(function(e){return e[0].addEventListener(e[1],l)}),l();!0===t.mutationObserverSupport&&!0===r.observeChanges&&new MutationObserver(function(e){return e.forEach(function(){a(document.querySelectorAll(n)).forEach(function(e){-1===u.indexOf(e)&&(u.push(e),!0===t.intersectionObserverSupport?c.observe(e):l())})})}).observe(document.querySelector(r.observeRootSelector),r.mutationObserverOptions)}}();document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded",function(){yall({observeChanges:true,lazyClass:'lazyfvm'});});/* */

A moat can be a pretty good thing. It can be lovely. It keeps rodents away from the castle. It can have fish in it. Even fish that talk. … If you give people access, they take advantage. My phone would ring 75 times in a row. Finally, I would pick it up and say, ‘Who the hell is this?’ ‘Oh, hi! I’m calling from so-and-so’s office…’ What kind of person would ever, ever let the phone ring 75 times? And I guess that’s when I started thinking: I can do without these people. Bill Murray
And, always, remember, even when the memories pinch your heart. Because the pain of all your experience is what makes you the person you are now. And without your experience---you are an empty page, a blank notebook, a missing lyric. What makes you brave is your willingness to live through your terrible life and hold your head up high the next day. So don't live life in fear. Because you are stronger now, after all the crap has happened, than you ever were back before it started.”
“A woman or man of value doesn’t love you because of what he or she wants you to be or do for them. He or she loves you because your combined souls understand one another, complements each other, and make sense above any other person in this world. You each share a part of their soul's mirror and see each other’s light reflected in it clearly. You can easily speak from the heart and feel safe doing so. Both of you have been traveling a parallel road your entire life. Without each other's presence, you feel like an old friend or family member was lost. It bothers you, not because you have given it too much meaning, but because God did. This is the type of person you don't have to fight for because you can't get rid of them and your heart doesn't want them to leave anyways.”
We are so often hit with negativity—negative news, negative perspectives—from pessimistic people that it might seem next to impossible to continue on with a positive spirit. Instead of getting stuck in the negativity, turn to those habitually optimistic people who have figured out how to see the brighter side of life and remain positive no matter what… so you can learn to do the same.
When we honestly ask ourselves which person in our lives means the most us, we often find that it is those who, instead of giving much advice, solutions, or cures, have chosen rather to share our pain and touch our wounds with a gentle and tender hand. The friend who can be silent with us in a moment of despair or confusion, who can stay with us in an hour of grief and bereavement, who can tolerate not knowing, not curing, not healing and face with us the reality of our powerlessness, that is a friend who cares. Henri Nouwen
×